John Tallis’s London Street Views

A piece of mine called ‘Transformation and Specialization in London and its Topography’ has just been published by the Journal of Victorian Culture; this is part of a roundtable examining John Tallis’s London Street Views (1838-40).  At the moment, not all of the contributions have appeared, but in a few days (and in the physical copy of the journal when it comes out later in the year), this will form part of a wider discussion of the Street Views superintended by Alison O’Byrne and Jon Stobart, arising out of a fun day of conversations at the Royal Institute of British Architects last year.

Romantic London’s map showing the locations of Tallis’s Street Views isn’t part of the main site interface as I don’t have copies of the images available at present, but it can be viewed here if you’re interested.

If you’d like to read more about the Street Views, the Museum of London has created a really interesting interface mapping the western streets that Tallis depicted.  There’s also a great blog by the mysterious Baldwin Hamey that explores the Street Views in detail.

Picturing Places and the 1819 Plan

The British Library has recently launched Picturing Places, a new resource exploring its rich topographical holdings.  Many of the images used on this site – including the Plan itself – were kindly provided by the library, so I was very glad to be able to give something back by contributing an article on ‘Accumulating London’ to the project.  This article explores the interactions between a series of different publications from the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries that sought to claim particular niches through depicting the city.  Some of these works are covered by Romantic London already, but a couple will form part of a major update to the site that I’ll be launching in stages over the next month or so.

The first part of this update is something that I’ve wanted to make a part of the site for a very long time – the revised fourth edition of Horwood’s Plan published by William Faden in 1819.  I’ve now added this as a new tiled map layer for all the existing content, allowing visitors to explore the changes in the city over the course of the early nineteenth century by contrasting Horwood’s original with Faden’s final revision.  I’ll be adding a fuller discussion of the additions that Faden and his cartographers made to the Plan at a later date, but if you’re keen to trace the development of the docks and the East End, examine the creation of Regent Street or look at what Regent’s Park might have looked like if the original designs had been followed more closely, a page for exploring the 1819 version can be seen here.

Coherence and Inclusion in the Life Writing of Romantic-period London

The first article that I wrote arising from this project, ‘Coherence and Inclusion in the Life Writing of Romantic-period London’, has just been published in a special issue of Life Writing edited by Felicity James and Julian North and showcasing papers from their Writing Lives Together conference (held in September 2015).  The article is behind a paywall, but if anyone without appropriate library access is interested in reading it, I have a direct access link that I’d be happy to send by email.

I’ve been drawn away from this site for the past few months by the process of settling into Glasgow and because of exciting developments with the AHRC-funded ‘Institutions of Literature, 1700-1900’ network that I’m co-running, but I’ve now completed work on three additional curations that I’ll be linking in with the main body of the site shortly.  I’m also hoping to have a bit more time over the summer to make some fairly substantial changes and updates.

Keats, and What’s Happening

581 x 52.7 cm

The area around No. 8 Dean Street, where John Keats lived briefly in 1816

I’ve been a bit delayed in moving forward with Romantic London due to my relocating to take up a new job at the University of Glasgow, but now that I’m beginning to settle in, I’m hoping to have the time to finish off work on the next phase of updates to the site, which will add a series of further topographical works, as well as some new literary texts.  In the meantime, I’ve got a number of pieces of writing relating to the project coming out over the next few months, the first of which is a contribution to the Keats Letters Project on John Keats and urban time.  The folks over there also put together a cool video showing off some of the ways that you can use Horwood’s Plan to help investigate the materials that they’re working on.  The Keats Letters Project is republishing every surviving letter by Keats two hundred years after the date when it was written (or as close to this date as can be established), with commentary by a range of different scholars and creative writers.  It’s a great idea and there’s a lot of really thought-provoking material already published, so it’s well worth checking out.